We are family too (Part I)

P1030786Greeting loyal readers and fellow maremmas.  Mummy was telling Me and Nellie about this article she read online about pets and natural disasters.  When family first moved into the sunny Mangamahu valley, mummy was contacted by the local civil defence asking how many members of the family there were.  She said there was two adults, two children and one dog. (Nellie had not joined Us at this point in time) The civil defence man said I was not family.  Imagine that, loyal readers, Me and Nellie not being family and, therefore, We would not be rescued should there be another civil defence emergency.

Pets need to be evacuated with families – researcher

Steve Glassey, with his dog Diesel.

Steve Glassey, with his dog Diesel.

Pets need to be evacuated along with their other family members in emergencies, a University of Canterbury researcher says.

Associate Director of the university’s Risk Resilience and Renewal Centre, Steve Glassey said it has taken hard lessons for the emergency management sector to take the issue of pets in disasters seriously.

Glassey was speaking at the Australia and New Zealand disaster management conference in Queensland.

In the September 2010 Canterbury earthquake more than 3000 animals were killed, he said.

Meanwhile, following Hurricane Katrina in 2006, more than 50,000 pets were left behind during the evacuation of New Orleans and 80 to 90 per cent subsequently died.

Many of the best practices in companion animal emergency management stemmed from
the disaster, he said.

“About 44 per cent of the people who did not evacuate for Hurricane Katrina stayed, at least in part, because they did not want to leave their pets behind.

“Though there may be a legal power to evacuate people without their pets, from an evidence based approach to emergency management, let alone a moral obligation – pets need to be evacuated along with their other family members.”

With most New Zealanders owning pets, they needed to be included in emergency management arrangements, Mr Glassey said.

“Simply put, saving pets equals saving people. There is academic consensus that pet owners are more likely to refuse to evacuate if they are required to leave their pets, placing them and public safety personnel at risk.

“In a survey of New Zealand pet owners, 58 per cent of respondents indicated they would likely return to rescue their pets if left behind, despite advice from public safety officials,” he said.

“By forcing pet owners to leave their pets in a disaster, pet owners are more likely to be psychologically impacted.

“So we are actually harming our communities by not evacuating pets and putting their safety, along with the safety of our front line personnel at risk.”

From the New Zealand Herald.

Now you wouldn’t think that the sunny Mangamahu Valley would be a safe place to live, there has been a number of floods over the years, however, the biggest danger is the threat of a lahar.  While the 1953 lahar did not threaten the valley, the potential is there.

See Part II for more about Mangamahu and lahars.

From Nellie and Jasper, the bestest maremmas in all the land.

P1030694

 

 

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11 Responses to We are family too (Part I)

  1. fredrieka says:

    I can not imagine not going with my parentswithoutpaws

  2. I would have slapped that man in the face if he said that to me.

  3. Mom would never leave me behind. Here in the US I hope we have learned a lesson from Hurricane Katrina. That was too sad.

    Love and licks,
    Cupcake

  4. Two French Bulldogs says:

    Very good information. It’s do sad when a pet is left behind we don’t understand it
    Lily & Edward

  5. Kuruk says:

    We will always go where Mama goes! Wooooooooowooooooooo!

  6. Kyla says:

    Not part of the family?? I hate it when someone says that I’m like one of the family. I AM FAMILY.

  7. lynn says:

    Because of Katrina, when Rita but 2 months later most shelters and hotels changed their policies and allowed pets. One friend said there were more ports than people in the hotel where he stayed.

  8. WHAT!? They don’t count you as family!!!! We are just barkless! Barkless we tell you!
    Wally & Sammy

  9. Mom said she could not imagine evacuating without her fur babies. We ARE her family and anyone who says otherwise is an idiot. Here in Louisiana they learned the hard way about that. They are now trying to make it easier with pets knowing the devotion people have to them. Plus in a situation like that having your pets with you can help calm the owners during a stressful situation.

  10. Clowie says:

    It’s terrible to think of leaving pets behind. I’m glad that things are changing.

  11. You would not get me to leave without the kids! That’s for D@#N sure!
    Marty’s Mom

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